Archive for the 'Arugula' Category

Arugula and Grapefruit Salad

Monday, January 28th, 2008

Sara Jones, Tucson CSA

Another recipe inspired by our farm visit, peppery arugula
and sweet/sour grapefruit go perfect together in this simple
recipe. The hardest part of this recipe is segmenting the
grapefruit. To do this, just peel the grapefruit with a knife,
cutting away the peel as well as the pith. Remove the
individual segments by cutting between segments in a V
shape towards the center of the fruit.

1 bunch arugula, washed and dried (chop roughly if using
large leaves)
1 grapefruit, cut into segments
1 small handful thinly sliced onion
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 teaspoon balsamic vinegar
Salt and freshly ground pepper
Chopped pecans or walnuts
Crumbled feta or blue cheese

In a small saucepan heat oil, vinegar and grapefruit over
medium high heat. Stir for a few minutes until grapefruit
has released some juice.

Season mixture with salt and pepper. Pour over arugula, tossing to coat. Garnish with nuts and cheese. Serve immediately.

Arugula Pasta

Tuesday, November 20th, 2007

Sara Jones, Tucson CSA

Arugula goes really well with a hearty, whole wheat pasta.
You can add more ingredients to this simple recipe, or
leave it as is. I like mine best with garbanzo beans or
pecans mixed in, plus parmesan on top.

1-2 bunches Arugula or other green, washed and chopped
1/2 onion, diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tablespoon olive oil
Cooked whole wheat pasta for 2-4 people, plus 1/4 cups
reserved pasta water
Salt and pepper to taste

Cook onion in oil over medium heat, stirring often, until
brown and caramelized. Stir in garlic and cook briefly
then add greens and cooked pasta and water. Season with
salt and pepper and cook until water is mostly evaporated
and greens are wilted.

Eggplant and Arugula Sandwiches

Monday, October 15th, 2007

Sara Jones, Tucson CSA

Use the arugula pesto from the recipe below to make this
simple sautéed eggplant sandwich really special.

1 large or 2-3 small eggplant
1 bell pepper
½ small onion
1 tablespoon olive oil
Salt and pepper to taste
Arugula Pesto*

Cut vegetables lengthwise into ¼ inch thick slices. Heat
oil in a skillet over medium high heat. Add a single layer
of vegetable strips and cook until beginning to brown.
Turn vegetables and brown on other side. Remove to a
paper towel and cook the rest of vegetables in batches until
finished. Sprinkle vegetables with salt and pepper.

Assemble sandwiches by spreading 1-2 tablespoons of
pesto over each sandwich bottom, and then adding cooked
vegetables.

Arugula Pesto*

Sara Jones, Tucson CSA

Spicy Arugula is a great herb for pesto. Add or substitute
some basil for variety and use whatever nuts you have on
hand. Serve tossed with pasta or spread on a sandwich.

1 bunch Arugula
2-3 cloves garlic
½ cup toasted walnuts
¼ cup olive oil
2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese (optional)
Salt and pepper to taste

Wash and dry arugula. Pulse garlic and walnuts in food
processor or blender until coarsely ground. Add the
arugula (and basil if using) and olive oil, and continue to
pulse to desired consistency. Add the cheese last, and then
season with salt and pepper to taste.

Arugula Pesto 2

Monday, October 15th, 2007

Sara Jones, Tucson CSA

Spicy Arugula is a great herb for pesto. Add or substitute
some basil for variety and use whatever nuts you have on
hand. Serve tossed with pasta or spread on a sandwich.

1 bunch Arugula
2-3 cloves garlic
½ cup toasted walnuts
¼ cup olive oil
2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese (optional)
Salt and pepper to taste

Wash and dry arugula. Pulse garlic and walnuts in food
processor or blender until coarsely ground. Add the
arugula (and basil if using) and olive oil, and continue to
pulse to desired consistency. Add the cheese last, and then
season with salt and pepper to taste.

Linguine with Arugula, Pine Nuts and Parmesan Cheese

Wednesday, September 13th, 2006

Phoenix SW Valley CSA

1 pound linguine
1/2 cup olive oil
4 ounces arugula, trimmed
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup pine nuts, toasted
additional freshly grated Parmesan cheese

Cook linguine in large pot of boiling salted water until just tender but still firm to bite, stirring occasionally. Meanwhile, heat oil in heavy large skillet over medium heat. Add arugula and stir until just wilted, about 30 seconds. Remove from heat. Drain pasta and return to pot. Add arugula and toss well. Add 1 cup Parmesan and salt and pepper to taste; toss well. Transfer to bowl. Sprinkle with pine nuts. Serve immediately, passing additional Parmesan separately. Serves 6.

About Arugula

Sunday, August 20th, 2006

Arugula (Eruca sativa) is the American and Spanish name for this pungent green, which is also known as roquette in French, rocket in English and rucola in Italian.  It originates from the Mediterranean region where it has been grown since Roman times.

It has green spear-shaped leaves, with several indentations, or notches, at the base. The leaves taste nutty, with a hint of pepper.

Like many greens, arugula can be used raw in salads or in a pesto, or cooked in soups, stuffing, stir-frys, and pasta dishes.  A popular combination is arugula mixed with mozzarella, sun-dried tomatoes and a drizzle of olive oil.

At the farm, arugula plays an important role in the fields’ biological pest control and integrated pest management methods.  Farmer Frank often lets some of the arugula in the fields go through its complete growth cycle, along with carrot and some other leafy plants, to provide a harbor for beneficial insects.

NUTRITION Like almost all leafy greens, arugula is low in calories and high in vitamin C, and as for the larger category of cruciferous vegetables it is also known for its anticarcinogenic properties.

Arugula Pesto 1

Saturday, August 5th, 2006

Celine Hayden, TCSA

This makes a great spread for bread, or try a slice with the Black Mesa Ranch goat cheese, some pesto, and slices of fresh tomatoes on top. Yum!

1/2 cup toasted pine nuts (can also use other nuts)
1 bunch or bag arugula
1-3 tablespoons white balsamic vinegar (can also use red but mutes the green color of the arugula)
1-2 cloves crushed garlic
olive oil
salt and pepper to taste

Toast nuts in a pan and add to food processor or blender. Also add arugula, 1 to 2 tablespoon vinegar, crushed garlic, salt and pepper and blend until well mixed (very thick paste). Add olive oil until pesto is desired consistency (usually until it’s spreadable).
Note: the vinegar takes some of the bite out of the arugula. Add more or less depending on taste.
Also, blending the garlic, vinegar, salt, nuts, and arugula before adding the oil is important–it allows the flavors to permeate the vinegar and make it more flavorful (or so my mother always told me).


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